Advertisement

The Technology-Enhanced Ability Continuum-of-Care Home Program for People with Cognitive Disorders: Concept Design and Scenario of Use

  • Olivia Realdon
  • Federica Rossetto
  • Marco Nalin
  • Ilaria Baroni
  • Maria Romano
  • Felice Catania
  • David Frontini
  • Sergio Mancastroppa
  • Margherita Alberoni
  • Valentino Zurloni
  • Raffaello Nemni
  • Fabrizia Mantovani
  • Francesca Baglio
  • The Ability Consortium
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering book series (LNICST, volume 253)

Abstract

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been identified as one of the 25 top causes of years lived with disability. Currently, no pharmacological treatment can prevent, slow down, or stop the course of this disease. From the clinical and health management perspectives, Mild Cognitive Impairment – a condition representing a risk factor for the development of dementia - and early stages of AD are the most interesting conditions for interventions aimed at delaying further decline. Telemonitoring and telerehabilitation home-based services have been advocated to provide manifold benefits for people with cognitive disorders. In this paper, we will describe the concept vision enlightening Ability, a technology-enhanced continuity-of-care home program for people with cognitive disorders. After describing the platform architecture, we will present a use case showing how it benefits people with cognitive disorders and both formal and informal caregivers by generating intertwining support in the process of care, enhancing well-being, health conditions, and inclusion.

Keywords

Telerehabilitation Cognitive disorders Alzheimer’s disease Dementia Cognitive rehabilitation 

References

  1. 1.
    Byass, P.: A transition towards a healthier global population? Lancet 386(10009), 2121–2122 (2015).  https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)61476-3CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Murray, C.J., et al.: Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for 306 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 188 countries, 1990–2013: quantifying the epidemiological transition. Lancet 386(10009), 2145–2191 (2015).  https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)61340-XCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Winblad, B., et al.: Defeating Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias: a priority for European science and society. Lancet Neurol. 15, 455–532 (2015).  https://doi.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(16)00062-4CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Dubois, B., et al.: Preclinical Alzheimer’s disease: definition, natural history, and diagnostic criteria. Alzheimers Dement 12, 292–323 (2016).  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2016.02.002CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Woods, B., Aguirre, E., Spector, A.E., Orrell, M.: Cognitive stimulation to improve cognitive functioning in people with dementia. Cochrane Database Syst. Rev. (2), CD005562 (2012).  https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD005562.pub2
  6. 6.
    Jean, L., Bergeron, M.È., Thivierge, S., Simard, M.: Cognitive intervention programs for individuals with mild cognitive impairment: systematic review of the literature. Am. J. Geriatr. Psychiat 18, 281–296 (2010).  https://doi.org/10.1097/JGP.0b013e3181c37ce9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    García-Casal, J.A., Loizeau, A., Csipke, E., Franco-Martín, M., Perea-Bartolomé, M.V., Orrell, M.: Computer-based cognitive interventions for people living with dementia: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Aging Mental Health 21, 454–467 (2016).  https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2015.1132677CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Theodoros, D., Russell, T., Latifi, R.: Telerehabilitation: current perspectives. Stud. Health Technol. Inform. 131, 191–210 (2008)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kairy, D., Lehoux, P., Vincent, C., Visintin, M.: A systematic review of clinical outcomes, clinical process, healthcare utilization and costs associated with telerehabilitation. Disabil. Rehabil. 31, 427–447 (2009).  https://doi.org/10.1080/09638280802062553CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Dinesen, B., et al.: Personalized telehealth in the future: a global research agenda. J. Med. Internet Res. 18, e53 (2016).  https://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.5257CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Martin, M., Clare, L., Altgassen, M., Cameron, H., Zehnder, F.: Cognition-based interventions for healthy older people and people with mild cognitive impairment. Cochrane Database Syst. Rev. (1) (2011).  https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD006220.pub2
  12. 12.
    Bahar-Fuchs, A., Clare, L., Woods, B.: Cognitive training and cognitive rehabilitation for mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. Cochrane Database Syst. Rev. (6) (2013).  https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD003260.pub2
  13. 13.
    Zygouris, S., Tsolaki, M.: Computerized cognitive testing for older adults: a review. Am. J. Alzheimers Dis. Other Demen. 30, 13–28 (2015).  https://doi.org/10.1177/1533317514522852CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Cotelli, M., et al.: Cognitive telerehabilitation in mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia: a systematic review. J. Telemed. Telecare (2017).  https://doi.org/10.1177/1357633X17740390
  15. 15.
    Baglio, F., et al.: Multistimulation group therapy in Alzheimer’s disease promotes changes in brain functioning. Neurorehabilitation Neural Repair 29, 13–24 (2015).  https://doi.org/10.1177/1545968314532833CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Maffei, L., et al.: Randomized trial on the effects of a combined physical/cognitive training in aged MCI subjects: the train the brain study. Sci. Rep. 7 (2017).  https://doi.org/10.1038/srep39471
  17. 17.
    Realdon, O., et al.: Technology-enhanced multi-domain at home continuum of care program with respect to usual care for people with cognitive impairment: the Ability-TelerehABILITation study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. BMC Psychiatry 16, 425 (2016).  https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-016-1132-yCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Riva, G., Banos, R.M., Botella, C., Wiederhold, B.K., Gaggioli, A.: Positive technology: using interactive technologies to promote positive functioning. Cyberpsychol Behav. Soc. Netw. 15, 69–77 (2012).  https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2011.0139CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Tomasello, M.: The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition. Harvard University Press, Cambridge (2009)Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Wald, C.: Better together. Nature 531, S14–S15 (2016).  https://doi.org/10.1038/531S14aCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© ICST Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olivia Realdon
    • 1
  • Federica Rossetto
    • 2
  • Marco Nalin
    • 3
  • Ilaria Baroni
    • 3
  • Maria Romano
    • 3
  • Felice Catania
    • 4
  • David Frontini
    • 4
  • Sergio Mancastroppa
    • 4
  • Margherita Alberoni
    • 2
  • Valentino Zurloni
    • 1
  • Raffaello Nemni
    • 2
    • 5
  • Fabrizia Mantovani
    • 1
  • Francesca Baglio
    • 2
  • The Ability Consortium
  1. 1.Università degli Studi di Milano-BicoccaMilanItaly
  2. 2.IRCCS Fondazione don Carlo GnocchiMilanItaly
  3. 3.Telbios S. r. l, Research & DevelopmentMilanItaly
  4. 4.Astir S. r. l, IT DevelopmentMilanItaly
  5. 5.Department of Pathophysiology and TransplantationUniversità degli Studi di MilanoMilanItaly

Personalised recommendations