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HeLiS: An Ontology for Supporting Healthy Lifestyles

  • Mauro DragoniEmail author
  • Tania Bailoni
  • Rosa Maimone
  • Claudio Eccher
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11137)

Abstract

The use of knowledge resources in the digital health domain is a trending activity significantly grown in the last decade. In this paper, we present HeLiS: an ontology aiming to provide in tandem a representation of both the food and physical activity domains and the definition of concepts enabling the monitoring of users’ actions and of their unhealthy behaviors. We describe the construction process, the plan for its maintenance, and how this ontology has been used into a real-world system with a focus on “Key to Health”: a project for promoting healthy lifestyles on workplaces.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mauro Dragoni
    • 1
    Email author
  • Tania Bailoni
    • 1
  • Rosa Maimone
    • 1
  • Claudio Eccher
    • 1
  1. 1.FBK-IRSTTrentoItaly

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