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B2DASH: Bandwidth and Buffer-Based Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP

  • Peihan Du
  • Jian Wang
  • Xin Wang
  • Zufeng Xu
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering book series (LNICST, volume 251)

Abstract

Currently, video streaming technology is widely used for entertainment, advertising, social networking and so on. Dynamic adaptive streaming over HTTP (DASH) has largely replaced the previous release of streaming video using UDP. Many researchers have proposed algorithms to improve DASH performance. There are two types of methods: bandwidth-based and buffer-based. Both methods have pros and cons. In this article, we propose a DASH algorithm that takes both bandwidth and buffer into account. And we imitate the method of network congestion control to adjust bitrate of the video segment. The algorithm was implemented and tested, and compared with the state-of-the-art DASH algorithm–BOLA. The results showed that B2DASH outperformed BOLA for both the average bitrate and buffer rise time.

Keywords

Adaptive algorithm MPEG dynamic adaptive streaming over HTTP (MPEG DASH) Bandwidth and buffer-based algorithm Congestion control 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by State Key Laboratory of Smart Grid Protection and Control of NARI Group Corporation.

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Copyright information

© ICST Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nanjing UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.61428 unit of the Chinese People’s Liberation ArmyBeijingChina
  3. 3.State Key Laboratory of Smart Grid Protection and Control, NARI Group CorporationNanjingChina

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