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Wind Energy Systems

  • Anindita Roy
  • Santanu Bandyopadhyay
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides a historical account of wind power development and its varied applications. Given that centralized electrification embodies huge investments which many developing and underdeveloped countries cannot afford, the pivotal role of wind power as a major source of electricity in off-grid locations is outlined. These applications include but are not restricted to rural electrification, island power systems, replacement of diesel-powered generation in telecommunication towers and agricultural pumps, street lighting and home lighting systems. The two major configurations of wind turbines, viz. vertical and horizontal axis type, are elucidated along with their operational characteristics. Further, the design parameters of wind machines which characterize its performance and play a role in the energy generation and system sizing are discussed.

Keywords

History of wind power Role of wind power in isolated power systems Wind turbine types Operating characteristics of wind machines 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anindita Roy
    • 1
  • Santanu Bandyopadhyay
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringPimpri Chinchwad College of EngineeringPuneIndia
  2. 2.Department of Energy Science & EngineeringIndian Institute of Technology BombayMumbaiIndia

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