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Tumor Delineation for Brain Radiosurgery by a ConvNet and Non-uniform Patch Generation

  • Egor Krivov
  • Valery Kostjuchenko
  • Alexandra Dalechina
  • Boris Shirokikh
  • Gleb Makarchuk
  • Alexander Denisenko
  • Andrey Golanov
  • Mikhail Belyaev
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11075)

Abstract

Deep learning methods are actively used for brain lesion segmentation. One of the most popular models is DeepMedic, which was developed for segmentation of relatively large lesions like glioma and ischemic stroke. In our work, we consider segmentation of brain tumors appropriate to stereotactic radiosurgery which limits typical lesion sizes. These differences in target volumes lead to a large number of false negatives (especially for small lesions) as well as to an increased number of false positives for DeepMedic. We propose a new patch-sampling procedure to increase network performance for small lesions. We used a 6-year dataset from a stereotactic radiosurgery center. To evaluate our approach, we conducted experiments with the three most frequent brain tumors: metastasis, meningioma, schwannoma. In addition to cross-validation, we estimated quality on a hold-out test set which was collected several years later than the train one. The experimental results show solid improvements in both cases.

Keywords

Stereotactic radiosurgery Segmentation CNN MRI 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The results of sections 1, 2, 4 and 5 are based on the scientific research conducted at IITP RAS and supported by the Russian Science Foundation under grant 17-11-01390.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Egor Krivov
    • 1
    • 2
  • Valery Kostjuchenko
    • 3
  • Alexandra Dalechina
    • 3
  • Boris Shirokikh
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Gleb Makarchuk
    • 4
  • Alexander Denisenko
    • 4
  • Andrey Golanov
    • 5
  • Mikhail Belyaev
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Kharkevich Institute for Information Transmission ProblemsMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Moscow Institute of Physics and TechnologyMoscowRussia
  3. 3.Moscow Gamma-Knife CenterMoscowRussia
  4. 4.Skolkovo Institute of Science and TechnologyMoscowRussia
  5. 5.Burdenko Neurosurgery InstituteMoscowRussia

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