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Word-Initial Irregular Phonation as a Function of Speech Rate and Vowel Quality in Hungarian

  • Alexandra Markó
  • Andrea Deme
  • Márton Bartók
  • Tekla Etelka Gráczi
  • Tamás Gábor Csapó
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10733)

Abstract

We examined vowel-initial irregular phonation in real words as a function of vowel quality, backness and height, and speech rate in Hungarian. We analyzed two types of irregular phonation: glottalization and glottal stop. We found that open vowels elicited more irregular phonation than mid and close ones, but we found no effect of the backness. The frequency of irregular phonation was lower in fast than in slow speech. Inconsistently with the claims of earlier studies, the relative frequency of glottalization to glottal stops was not influenced by speech rate in general. However, while /i/ was produced with a relatively higher ratio of glottal stops in fast speech, the open vowels showed the widely documented tendency of being realized with relatively less glottal stops under the same conditions.

Keywords

Irregular phonation Glottal stop Glottalization Vowel height Vowel backness Speech rate 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The authors are grateful to Gergely Varjasi for his valuable help in recruitment of the participants and in conducting the experiments.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexandra Markó
    • 1
    • 2
  • Andrea Deme
    • 1
    • 2
  • Márton Bartók
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tekla Etelka Gráczi
    • 1
    • 3
  • Tamás Gábor Csapó
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.MTA–ELTE “Lendület” Lingual Articulation Research GroupBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Department of PhoneticsEötvös Loránd UniversityBudapestHungary
  3. 3.Research Institute for LinguisticsHungarian Academy of SciencesBudapestHungary
  4. 4.Department of Telecommunication and Media InformaticsBudapest University of Technology and EconomicsBudapestHungary

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