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The Quest for African Permanent Membership of the UNSC: A Comparative Assessment of Nigeria and South Africa’s Eligibility

  • Michael Thekiso
  • Jo-Ansie van WykEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Advances in African Economic, Social and Political Development book series (AAESPD)

Abstract

UN and UNSC reforms have been on the agenda for some time. Africa’s common position on UN reform, the Ezulwini Consensus, is one of the plethora of proposals in this regard. South Africa and Nigeria are two of the strongest African contenders for a permanent seat on the UNSC. These ambitions cause some diplomatic friction on the continent and, in particular, between South Africa and Nigeria. It is against this background that this contribution assesses the need and case for Africa’s permanent representation in the UNSC. This chapter explores and assesses African proposals with regard to representation in the UNSC, with particular reference to South Africa and Nigeria’s eligibility in terms of the criteria formulated by UN Panels and other high-level reports. The authors also analyse the prominence of African states in the UNSC vis-à-vis their possible inclusion in the UNSC as permanent members.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of DefenceRepublic of South AfricaPretoriaSouth Africa
  2. 2.University of South AfricaPretoriaSouth Africa

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