Active Tangible Interactions

  • Masahiko Inami
  • Maki Sugimoto
  • Bruce H. Thomas
  • Jan Richter
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores active tangible interactions, an extension of tangible user interactions. Active tangible interactions employ tangible objects with some form of self automation in the form of robotics or locomotion. Tangible user interfaces employ physical objects to form graspable physical interfaces for a user to control a computer application. Two example forms of active tangible interactions are presented, Local Active Tangible Interactions and Remote Active Tangible Interactions. Local Active Tangible Interactions (LATI) is a concept that allows users to interact with actuated physical interfaces such as small robots locally. The Remote Active Tangible Interactions (RATI) system is a fully featured distributed version of multiple LATI’s. The underlining technology Display-Based Measurement and Control System is employed to support our instantiations of Local Active Tangible Interactions and Remote Active Tangible Interactions.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masahiko Inami
    • Maki Sugimoto
      • Bruce H. Thomas
        • 1
      • Jan Richter
        • 1
      1. 1.Graduate School of Media DesignKeio UniversityYokohamaJapan
      2. 2.Wearable Computer Lab, School of Computer and Information ScienceUniversity of South AustraliaMawson LakesAustralia

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