Advertisement

Digital Tables for Collaborative Information Exploration

  • Petra Isenberg
  • Uta Hinrichs
  • Mark Hancock
  • Sheelagh Carpendale
Chapter
Part of the Human-Computer Interaction Series book series (HCIS)

Abstract

There is great potential for digital tabletop displays to be integrated in tomorrow’s work and learning environments, in which the exploration of information is a common task. In this chapter, we describe the stream of research that focuses on digital tabletop collaborative visualization environments. We focus on two types of interfaces: those for information exploration and data analysis in the context of workplaces, and those for more casual information exploration in public settings such as museums.

Keywords

Domain Expert Public Space Interaction Technique Information Visualization Public Setting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Card S, Mackinlay JD, Shneiderman B (eds) (1999) Readings in information visualization: Using vision to think. Morgan Kauffman Publishers, Inc., San Francisco, CAGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Agrawala M, Beers AC, McDowall I, Fröhlich B, Bolas M, Hanrahan P (1997) The two-user responsive workbench: Support for collaboration through individual views of a shared space. In: Proceedings of computer graphics and interactive techniques (SIGGRAPH), ACM/Addison-Wesley, New York, pp 327–332Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Wesche G, Wind J, Göbe M, Rosenblum L, Durbin J, Doyle R, Tate D, King R, Fröhlich B, Fischer M, Agrawala M, Beers A, Hanrahan P, Bryson S (1997) Application of the responsive workbench. Computer Graphics and Applications 17(4):10–15CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Choi YJ, Choi SM, Rhee SM, Kim MH (2005) Collaborative and immersive medical education in a virtual workbench environment. In: Knowledge-based intelligent information and engineering systems, Spinger Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 1210–1217CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Forlines C, Shen C (2005) DTLens: Multi-user tabletop spatial data exploration. In: Proceedings of user interface software and technology (UIST), ACM Press, New York, USA, pp 119–122Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Dietz P, Leigh D (2001) Diamondtouch: A multi-user touch technology. In: Proceedings of user interface software and technology (UIST), ACM Press, New York, pp 219–226Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Isenberg P, Carpendale S (2007) Interactive tree comparison for co-located collaborative information visualization. IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics 13(6):1232–1239CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Scott SD, Grant KD, Mandryk RL (2003) System guidelines for co-located collaborative work on a tabletop display. In: Proceedings of the European conference on computer-supported cooperative work (ECSCW), Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, pp 159–178Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Ryall K, Morris MR, Everitt K, Forlines C, Shen C (2006) Experiences with and observations of direct-touch tabletops. In: Fjeld M, Takatsuka M (eds) Proceedings of horizontal interactive human-computer systems (TABLETOP), IEEE Press, Los Alamitos, CA, pp 89–96, doi: 10.1109/TABLETOP.2006.12Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Tobiasz M, Isenberg P, Carpendale S (2009) Lark: Coordinating co-located collaboration with information visualization. IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics 15(6):1065–1072CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Isenberg P, Fisher D (2009) Collaborative brushing and linking for co-located collaborative visual analytics of document collections. Computer Graphics Forum 28(3): 1031–1038CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Forlines C, Esenther A, Shen C, Wigdor D, Ryall K (2006) Multi-user, multi-display interaction with a single-user, single-display geospatial application. In: Proceedings of user interface software and technology (UIST), ACM Press, New York, pp 273–276Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Forlines C, Lilien R (2008) Adapting a single-user, single-display molecular visualization application for use in a multi-user, multi-display environment. In: Proceedings of advanced visual interfaces (AVI), ACM Press, New York, pp 367–371Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Wigdor D, Jiang H, Forlines C, Borkin M, Shen C (2009) WeSpace: The design development and deployment of a walk-up and share multi-surface visual collaboration system. In: Proceedings of human factors in computing systems (CHI ’09), ACM Press, New York, pp 1237–1246Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Ståhl O, Wallberg A, Söderberg J, Humble J, Fahlén LE, Bullock A, Lundberg J (2002) Information exploration using the pond. In: Proceedings of collaborative virtual environments (CVE), ACM Press, New York, pp 72–79Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    ART+COM (2004) floating.numbers. Website: http://artcom.de, accessed March 2008
  17. 17.
    ART+COM (2007) Tree of life. Website: http://www.artcom.de, accessed April 2009
  18. 18.
    Hornecker E (2008) “I don’t understand it but it is cool”: Visitor interactions with a multi-touch table in a museum. In: Proceedings of tabletops and interactive surfaces (TABLETOP), IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, pp 121–128Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Hinrichs U, Schmidt H, Carpendale S (2008) EMDialog: Bringing information visualization into the museum. IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics 14(6):1181–1188CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Schmidt H, Hinrichs U, Dunning A, Carpendale S (2007) memory [en]code – Building a collective memory within a tabletop installation. In: Proceedings of computational aesthetics in graphics, visualization, and imaging (CAe), Eurographics Association, Aire-la-Ville, Switzerland, pp 135–142Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Screven CG (2000) Information design in informal settings: Museums and other public spaces. In: Jacobson RE (ed) Information design. MIT Press, Cambridge, MAGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Allen S (2004) Designs for learning: Studying science museum exhibits that do more than entertain. Science Education 88(S1):S17–S33Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Benko H, Wilson AD, Baudisch P (2006) Precise selection techniques for multi-touch screens. In: Proceedings of human factors in computing systems (CHI), ACM Press, New York, pp 1263–1272Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Wigdor D, Shen C, Forlines C, Balakrishnan R (2007) Perception of elementary graphical elements in tabletop and multi-surface environments. In: Proceedings of human factors in computing systems (CHI), ACM Press, New York, pp 473–482Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Hancock M, Carpendale S (2007) Supporting multiple off-axis viewpoints at a tabletop display. In: Proceedings of horizontal interactive human-computer systems (TABLETOP), IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, pp 171–178Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Kitamura Y, Nakayama T, Nakashima T, Yamamoto S (2006) The illusionhole with polarization filters. In: Proceedings of virtual reality software and technology, ACM Press, New York, pp 244–251Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Wigdor D, Balakrishnan R (2005) Empirical investigation into the effect of orientation on text readability in tabletop displays. In: Proceedings of the European conference on computer-supported cooperative work (ECSCW), Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, pp 205–224Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Kruger R, Carpendale S, Scott SD, Tang A (2005) Fluid integration of rotation and translation. In: Proceedings of human factors in computing systems, ACM Press, New York, pp 601–610Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Liu J, Pinelle D, Sallam S, Subramanian S, Gutwin C (2006) TNT: Improved rotation and translation on digital tables. In: Proceedings of graphics interface, Canadian Information Processing Society, Mississauga, ON, pp 25–32Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Shen C, Vernier FD, Forlines C, Ringel M (2004) DiamondSpin: An extensible toolkit for around-the-table interaction. In: Proceedings of human factors in computing systems (CHI), ACM Press, New York, pp 167–174Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Hancock MS, Vernier FD, Wigdor D, Carpendale S, Shen C (2006) Rotation and translation mechanisms for tabletop interaction. In: Proceedings of horizontal interactive human-computer systems (TABLETOP), IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, pp 79–86Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Tang A, Tory M, Po B, Neumann P, Carpendale S (2006) Collaborative coupling over tabletop displays. In: Proceedings of human factors in computing systems (CHI), ACM Press, New York, pp 1181–1190Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Isenberg P, Tang A, Carpendale S (2008) An exploratory study of visual information analysis. In: Proceedings of human factors in computing systems (CHI), ACM Press, New York, pp 1217–1226Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    vom Lehn D, Heath C, Hindmarsh J (2001) Exhibiting interaction: Conduct and collaboration in museums and galleries. Symbolic Interaction 24(2):189–216CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Petra Isenberg
    • Uta Hinrichs
      • Mark Hancock
        • Sheelagh Carpendale

          There are no affiliations available

          Personalised recommendations