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Supporting Atomic User Actions on the Table

  • Dzmitry Aliakseyeu
  • Sriram Subramanian
  • Jason Alexander
Chapter
Part of the Human-Computer Interaction Series book series (HCIS)

Abstract

One of the biggest obstacles that application developers and designers face is a lack of understanding of how to support basic/atomic user interactions. User actions, such as pointing, selecting, scrolling and menu navigation, are often taken for granted in desktop GUI interactions, but have no equivalent interaction techniques in tabletop systems. In this chapter we present a review of the state-of-the-art in interaction techniques for selecting, pointing, rotating, and scrolling. We, first, identify and classify existing techniques, then summarize user studies that were performed with these techniques, and finally identify and formulate design guidelines based on the solutions found.

Keywords

Physical Object Virtual Object Input Device Mode Switch Interaction Technique 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dzmitry Aliakseyeu
    • Sriram Subramanian
      • 1
    • Jason Alexander
      • 1
    1. 1.User Experiences GroupPhilips Research EuropeEindhovenThe Netherlands

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