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Low Back and Neck Pain

  • Rajiv K. Dixit
  • Joseph H. Schwab

Abstract

Low back pain is the most common musculoskeletal complaint. An estimated 80% of the population will experience low back pain over the course of their lifetime. The surgical treatment of common lumbar disorders accounts for over $20 billion as hospital fees each year in the United States. The rate of procedures directed at the lumbar spine is increasing faster than the aging of the population. Yet, the indications for and the efficacy of surgical interventions for common lumbar disorders have been a source of controversy. Low back pain affects the area between the lower rib cage and gluteal folds, and frequently radiates into the thighs. Neck pain is also a common complaint, affecting approximately 70% of the population at some time in their lives. Neck pain typically affects the posterior aspect of the neck and frequently radiates into the shoulder blades and deltoid muscles, even in the absence of nerve root or spinal cord involvement.

Keywords

Neck Pain Disc Herniation Spinal Stenosis Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Cervical Myelopathy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rajiv K. Dixit
    • 1
  • Joseph H. Schwab
    • 2
  1. 1.Medicine DepartmentUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Massachusetts General Hospital Department of OrthopedicsBoston

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