Otolaryngologic Manifestations of Sjögren’s Syndrome

Chapter

Abstract

Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is an insidious progressive autoimmune disease characterized by exocrinopathy and a predilection for women. It affects many organ systems; however, head and neck manifestations predominate and are frequently the initial presenting complaints. A high index of suspicion should be maintained to permit early diagnosis and minimize long-term complications of the disease. This chapter aims to review the otolaryngologic manifestations of Sjögren’s syndrome, current diagnostic tools, and treatment.

Keywords

Sjögren’s syndrome Oral Nasal Laryngeal Esophageal Esophageal dysmotility Laryngopharyngeal reflux Xerostomia Xerotrachea Hyposalivation Dental caries Salivary gland lymphoma Sialography Salivary scintigraphy Salivary MRI Lip biopsy Parotid biopsy Autoimmune Extra-glandular manifestations 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of OtolaryngologyUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.The Center for Voice and Swallowing, University of California at DavisDavisUSA

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