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Laparoscopic Bladder Augmentation and Creation of Continent-Catheterizable Stomas in the Pediatric Patient

  • Kristin A. KozakowskiEmail author
  • Walid A. Farhat
Chapter
Part of the Current Clinical Urology book series (CCU)

Abstract

The need for creation of a suitable urinary reservoir that provides a socially acceptable degree of both continence and independence arises in a wide variety of conditions in children. These conditions include spina bifida, posterior urethral valves, bladder exstrophy, and severe dysfunctional voiding. Augmentation cystoplasty with bowel segments along with the creation of a continent-catheterizable stoma is a well-described procedure that results in reducing the storage pressure of the native bladder and increasing the overall capacity to store urine while maintaining continence. Bladder augmentation is considered only after conservative medical management with anticholinergic medications and intermittent catheterization fails.

Keywords

Laparoscopic Bladder augmentation Continent catheterizable stomas Pediatric 

Supplementary material

Identifying Bowel Segments Suitable for Augment Cystoplasty (1.83 MB)

Measuring Ileal Segment with a Vessel Loop (2.62 MB)

Suspension of Bowel Segment Utilizing a Keith Needle (4.03 MB)

Creation of Mesenteric Windows (3.67 MB)

Isolation of Bowel Segment with a Laparoscopic EndoGIA Device (5.26 MB)

Laparoscopic Side-to-Side Functional End-to-End Bowel Anastomosis (5.57 MB)

Laparoscopic Detubularization of Ileum (5.19 MB)

Laparoscopic Bladder Mobilization and Cystostomy (5.91 MB)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UrologyThe Hospital for Sick ChildrenTorontoUSA
  2. 2.Division of Urology, Department of SurgeryThe Hospital for Sick ChildrenTorontoUSA

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