Separation of Oil from Wastewater by Air Flotation

  • Gary F. Bennett
  • Nazih K. Shammas
Chapter
Part of the Handbook of Environmental Engineering book series (HEE, volume 12)

Abstract

Air flotation, in all its variations, is an efficient way to extract oil from wastewater. If the wastewater is chemically pretreated to break the oil emulsions, air flotation units are capable of removing most of the emulsified oil in addition to the free oil. This chapter covers various flotation techniques to achieve oil/water separation. Flotation processes include electroflotation, dissolved air flotation (DAF), induced air flotation (IAF), and nozzle air flotation (NAF). Flotation system performance, air pollution aspects, product recovery from sludge (float), and costs of oil/water separation by flotation are covered.

Key Words

Oil/water separation DAF IAF electroflotation (EF) nozzle air flotation (NAF) performance costs. 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary F. Bennett
    • 1
  • Nazih K. Shammas
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.University of ToledoToledoUSA
  2. 2.Lenox Institute of Water TechnologyLenoxUSA
  3. 3.Krofta Engineering CorporationLenoxUSA

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