Beyond Partial Analysis

  • David Pelletier
Part of the Nutrition and Health Series book series (NH)

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Copyright information

© Humana Press, a part of Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Pelletier
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Nutritional ScienceCornell UniversityIthacaNY

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