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Haplotype Structure of the Mouse Genome

  • Jianmei Wang
  • Guochun Liao
  • Janet Cheng
  • Anh Nguyen
  • Jingshu Guo
  • Christopher Chou
  • Steven Hu
  • Sharon Jiang
  • John Allard
  • Steve Shafer
  • Anne Puech
  • John D. McPherson
  • Dorothee Foernzler
  • Gary Peltz
  • Jonathan Usuka

Abstract

Commonly available inbred mouse strains can be used to genetically model traits that vary in the human population, including those associated with disease susceptibility. In order to understand how genetic differences regulate trait variation in humans, we must first develop a detailed understanding of how genetic variation in the mouse produces the phenotypic differences among inbred mouse strains. The information obtained from analysis of experimental murine genetic models can direct biological experimentation, clinical research, and human genetic analysis. This “mouse to man” approach will increase our knowledge of the genes and pathways regulating important biological processes and disease susceptibility.

Keywords

Mouse Genome Inbred Strain Haplotypic Block Inbred Mouse Allelic Difference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jianmei Wang
    • 1
  • Guochun Liao
    • 1
  • Janet Cheng
    • 1
  • Anh Nguyen
    • 1
  • Jingshu Guo
    • 1
  • Christopher Chou
    • 1
  • Steven Hu
    • 1
  • Sharon Jiang
    • 1
  • John Allard
    • 1
  • Steve Shafer
    • 2
  • Anne Puech
    • 3
  • John D. McPherson
    • 4
  • Dorothee Foernzler
    • 5
  • Gary Peltz
    • 1
  • Jonathan Usuka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Genetics and GenomicsRoche Palo AltoPalo Alto
  2. 2.Department of AnesthesiaStanford University Medical CenterStanford
  3. 3.Centre National de GenotypageEvryFrance
  4. 4.Department of Molecular and Human Genetics and Human Genome Sequencing CenterBaylor College of MedicineHouston
  5. 5.Roche Center for Medical GenomicsF. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd.BaselSwitzerland

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