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International Public and Private Response

  • John W. Spink
Chapter
Part of the Food Microbiology and Food Safety book series (FMFS)

Abstract

This chapter addresses the international responses of both the public (governments and nongovernmental organizations) and private (industry or trade associations) activities related to understanding and managing food fraud prevention. To review this scope, there is a very brief overview of incidents to understand the severity of the issue; this is followed by a summary of foundational and more applied activities and then some of the collaboration interactions. The focus includes the UK, EU, China, and the international entities such as WHO, FAO, INFOSAN, Codex Alimentarius, ISO, INTERPOL-Europol, GFSI, and others.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Spink
    • 1
  1. 1.Michigan State UniversityOkemosUSA

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