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Backscattered Electrons

  • Joseph I. Goldstein
  • Dale E. Newbury
  • Joseph R. Michael
  • Nicholas W. M. Ritchie
  • John Henry J. Scott
  • David C. Joy
Chapter

Abstract

Close inspection of the trajectories in the Monte Carlo simulation of a flat, bulk target of gold at 0° tilt shown in Fig. 2.1 reveals that a significant fraction of the incident beam electrons undergo sufficient scattering events to completely reverse their initial direction of travel into the specimen, causing these electrons to return to the entrance surface and exit the specimen. These beam electrons that escape from the specimen are referred to as “backscattered electrons” (BSE) and constitute an important SEM imaging signal rich in information on specimen characteristics. The BSE signal can convey information on the specimen composition, topography, mass thickness, and crystallography. This module describes the properties of backscattered electrons and how those properties are modified by specimen characteristics to produce useful information in SEM images.

References

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  2. Heinrich KFJ (1966) Electron probe microanalysis by specimen current measurement. In: Castaing R, Deschamps P, Philibert J (eds) Proceeding 4th international conferences on x-ray optics and microanalysis. Hermann, Paris, p 159Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2018

Open Access This chapter is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/), which permits any noncommercial use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license and indicate if changes were made.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph I. Goldstein
    • 1
  • Dale E. Newbury
    • 2
  • Joseph R. Michael
    • 3
  • Nicholas W. M. Ritchie
    • 2
  • John Henry J. Scott
    • 2
  • David C. Joy
    • 4
  1. 1.University of MassachusettsAmherstUSA
  2. 2.National Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA
  3. 3.Sandia National LaboratoriesAlbuquerqueUSA
  4. 4.University of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA

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