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Quantitative Analysis: From k-ratio to Composition

  • Joseph I. Goldstein
  • Dale E. Newbury
  • Joseph R. Michael
  • Nicholas W. M. Ritchie
  • John Henry J. Scott
  • David C. Joy
Chapter

Abstract

A k-ratio is the ratio of a pair of characteristic X-ray line intensities, I, measured under similar experimental conditions for the unknown (unk) and standard (std):
$$ k={I}_{unk}/{I}_{std} $$
The measured intensities can be associated with a single characteristic X-ray line (as is typically the case for wavelength spectrometers) or associated with a family of characteristic X-ray lines (as is typically the case for energy dispersive spectrometers.) The numerator of the k-ratio is typically the intensity measured from an unknown sample and the denominator is typically the intensity measured from a standard material—a material of known composition.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph I. Goldstein
    • 1
  • Dale E. Newbury
    • 2
  • Joseph R. Michael
    • 3
  • Nicholas W. M. Ritchie
    • 2
  • John Henry J. Scott
    • 2
  • David C. Joy
    • 4
  1. 1.University of MassachusettsAmherstUSA
  2. 2.National Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA
  3. 3.Sandia National LaboratoriesAlbuquerqueUSA
  4. 4.University of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA

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