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Supporting Country-Driven Innovations and Agrifood Value Chains for Poverty and Hunger Reduction

  • Shenggen Fan
Chapter

Abstract

With around 805 million people suffering from hunger and about one billion people living in poverty, the global challenges of hunger and poverty are persisting at unacceptable levels. A “business as unusual” approach that is country-driven, more innovative, better focused, and more cost-effective is urgently needed to address these challenges. Given that the agricultural sector accounts for a large share of national income and employment in many developing countries, increasing agricultural investments and setting context-specific investment priorities are essential to broad-based growth and poverty reduction. Also of crucial importance are well-functioning and better-integrated agrifood value chains—ranging from inputs supply, extension, market services, financing, production, processing, and distribution to marketing—that promote market-oriented growth and reduce rural poverty in these countries. More and sound research evidence is needed to determine which strategies, technologies, investments, institutions, and partnerships should be scaled up in-country to achieve enduring impact on hunger and poverty. To this end stakeholders at all levels and from all sectors must work together.

Keywords

Country-driven innovations Agrifood value chains Poverty Hunger 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Food Policy Research InstituteWashington, DCUSA

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