Advertisement

Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow and Oxygenation During Induction of General Anesthesia with Sevoflurane Versus Propofol

  • Yuko Kondo
  • Noriya HiroseEmail author
  • Takeshi Maeda
  • Takahiro Suzuki
  • Atsuo Yoshino
  • Yoichi Katayama
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 876)

Abstract

Sevoflurane and propofol are widely used for induction and maintenance of general anesthesia. Although the effects of sevoflurane and propofol on cerebral hemodynamics during maintenance of general anesthesia have been demonstrated, the effects during induction of general anesthesia have still not been clarified. We therefore compared changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygenation (CBO) during induction of anesthesia using sevoflurane (group S: n = 9) or propofol (group P: n = 9). CBF and CBO were evaluated using the following variables: oxy-, deoxy-, and total-hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations and tissue oxygen index (TOI), measured on the forehead by near-infrared spectroscopy. The variables were recorded immediately before administration of sevoflurane or propofol and at every 10 s for 4 min after administration of the induction agent. Patients received 8 % sevoflurane in 100 % oxygen via an anesthesia mask in group S, and an IV bolus of 2 mg/kg of propofol during oxygenation in group P. We found that oxy-Hb, total-Hb, and TOI were significantly higher in group S than in group P (P > 0.05). Changes in deoxy-Hb, MBP, and HR did not differ between the groups. The results of the present study demonstrated that sevoflurane increases CBF and CBO during induction of general anesthesia.

Keywords

Near-infrared spectroscopy General anesthesia Sevoflurane, propofol Cerebral blood flow Oxygenation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank Kaoru Sakatani MD, PhD, (NEWCAT Institute, Department of Electronic Engineering, Nihon University College of Engineering, Koriyama, Japan) for assistance with data analysis.

References

  1. 1.
    Conti A, Iacopino DG, Fodale V et al (2006) Cerebral haemodynamic changes during propofol-remifentanil or sevoflurane anaesthesia: transcranial Doppler study under bispectral index monitoring. Br J Anaesth 97:333–339CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kaisti KK, Metsahonkala L, Teras M et al (2002) Effects of surgical levels of propofol and sevoflurane anesthesia on cerebral blood flow in healthy subjects studied with positron emission tomography. Anesthesiology 96:1358–1370CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ferrari M, Wilson DA, Hanley DF et al (1992) Effects of graded hypotension on cerebral blood flow, blood volume, and mean transit time in dogs. Am J Physiol 262:1908–1914Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Pryds O, Greisen G, Skov LL et al (1990) Carbon dioxide-related changes in cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow in mechanically ventilated preterm neonates: comparison of near infrared spectrophotometry and 133 Xenon clearance. Pediatr Res 27:445–449CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Yagi T, Nagao K, Sakatani K et al (2013) Changes of oxygen metabolism and hemodynamics during ECPR with hypothermia measured by near-infrared spectroscopy: a pilot study. Adv Exp Med Biol 789:121–128CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Matta BF, Hearth KJ, Tipping K et al (1999) Direct cerebral vasodilatory effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane. Anesthesiology 91:677–680CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Bundgaard H, von Oettingen G, Larsen KM et al (1998) Effects of sevoflurane on intracranial pressure, cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolism. A dose-response study in patients subjected to craniotomy for cerebral tumours. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 42:621–627CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Berkowitz RA, Hoffman WE, Cunningham F et al (1996) Changes in cerebral blood flow velocity in children during sevoflurane and halothane anesthesia. J Neurosurg Anesthesiol 8:194–198CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Rhodali O, Juhel S, Mathew S et al (2014) Impact of sevoflurane anesthesia on brain oxygenation in children younger than 2 years. Paediatr Anaesth 24:734–740CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuko Kondo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Noriya Hirose
    • 2
    Email author
  • Takeshi Maeda
    • 1
    • 2
  • Takahiro Suzuki
    • 2
  • Atsuo Yoshino
    • 1
  • Yoichi Katayama
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineItabashi-ku, TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Division of Anesthesiology, Department of AnesthesiologyNihon University School of MedicineItabashi-ku, TokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations