Understanding the Population Consequences of Acoustic Disturbance for Marine Mammals

  • John Harwood
  • Stephanie King
  • Cormac Booth
  • Carl Donovan
  • Robert S. Schick
  • Len Thomas
  • Leslie New
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 875)

Abstract

Loud anthropogenic underwater noise, such as that associated with sonar operations, pile driving, or seismic surveys, can cause behavioral and physiological disturbance to many animals that may affect their survival or ability to breed. However, no formal framework for assessing the population-level consequences of this disturbance is currently available. We describe an interim version of a framework developed by a working group on the population consequences of disturbance, funded by the US Office of Naval Research through the University of California, that can be used to assess the effects of offshore renewable energy developments on marine mammal populations.

Keywords

Renewable energy Noise 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Work on the development of the interim population consequences of disturbance protocol was supported by contracts to Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU) Marine from The Crown Estate, Marine Scotland, the Department for Energy and Climate Change, and the Natural Environment Research Council. The work benefited greatly from discussions with participants in a working group supported by Office of Naval Research Grants N00014-09-1-0896 to the University of California, Santa Barbara and N00014-12-1-0274 to the University of California, Davis.

References

  1. Aspinall W (2010) A route to more tractable expert advice. Nature 463:294–295CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. DeRuiter SL, Southall BL, Calambokidis J, Zimmer WM, Sadykova D, Falcone EA, Friedlaender AS, Joseph JE, Moretti D, Schorr GS, Thomas L, Tyack PL (2013) First direct measurements of behavioural responses by Cuvier’s beaked whales to mid-frequency active sonar. Biol Lett 9:20130223. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2013.0223 PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Goldbogen JA, Southall BL, DeRuiter SL, Calambokidis J, Friedlaender AS, Hazen EL, Falcone EA, Schorr GS, Douglas A, Moretti DJ, Kyburg C, McKenna MF, Tyack PL (2013) Blue whales respond to simulated mid-frequency military sonar. Proc R Soc B Biol Sci 280:20130657. doi:10.1098/rspb.2013.0657 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Lusseau D (2003) Effects of tour boats on the behaviour of bottlenose dolphins: Using Markov chains to model anthropogenic impacts. Conserv Biol 17:1785–1793CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Lusseau D (2004) The hidden cost of tourism: detecting long-term effects of tourism using behavioral information. Ecol Soc 9:2Google Scholar
  6. Martin TG, Burgman MA, Fidler F, Kuhnert PM, Low-Choy S, McBride M, Mengersen K (2012) Eliciting expert knowledge in conservation science. Conserv Biol 26:29–38CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Morris WF, Doak DF (2002) Quantitative conservation biology: Theory and practice of population viability analysis. Sinauer Associates, Inc., Sunderland, MAGoogle Scholar
  8. Nabe-Nielsen J, Tougaard J, Teilmann J, Sveegaard S (2011) Effects of wind farms on harbour porpoise behaviour and population dynamics. Report commissioned by the Environmental Group under the Danish Environmental Monitoring Programme. Scientific report from Danish Centre for Environment and Energy No. 1, Danish Centre for Environment and Energy, Aarhus University, Aarhus, DenmarkGoogle Scholar
  9. New LF, Clark JS, Costa DP, Fleishman E, Hindell MA, Klanjšček T, Lusseau D, Kraus S, McMahon CR, Robinson PW, Schick RS, Schwarz LK, Simmons SE, Thomas L, Tyack P, Harwood J (2014) Assessing the population-level effects of disturbance. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 496:99–108CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. New LF, Harwood J, Thomas L, Donovan C, Clark JS, Hastie G, Thompson PM, Cheney B, Scott-Hayward L, Lusseau D (2013a) Modelling the biological significance of behavioural change in coastal bottlenose dolphins in response to disturbance. Funct Ecol 27:314–322CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. New LF, Moretti DJ, Hooker SK, Costa DP, Simmons SE (2013b) Using energetic models to investigate the survival and reproduction of beaked whales (family Ziphiidae). PLoS ONE 8, e68725. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.006872 PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. NRC (National Research Council) (2005) Marine mammal populations and ocean noise: Determining when noise causes biologically significant effects. National Academies Press, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  13. Rolland RM, Parks SE, Hunt KE, Castellote M, Corkeron PJ, Nowacek DP, Wasser SK, Kraus SD (2012) Evidence that ship noise increases stress in right whales. Proc R Soc B Biol Sci 279:2363–2368CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Russ TC, Stamatakis E, Hamer M, Starr JM, Kivimäki M, Batty GD (2012) Association between psychological distress and mortality: Individual participant pooled analysis of 10 prospective cohort studies. Brit Med J 345, e4933PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Southall BL, Bowles AE, Ellison WT, Finneran JJ, Gentry RL, Greene CR Jr, Kastak D, Ketten DR, Miller JH, Nachtigall PE, Richardson WJ, Thomas JA, Tyack PL (2007) Marine mammal noise exposure criteria: Initial scientific recommendations. Aquat Mamm 33:411–521CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Speirs-Bridge A, Fidler F, McBride M, Flander L, Cumming G, Burgman M (2010) Reducing overconfidence in the interval judgments of experts. Risk Anal 30:512–523CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Thompson PM, Hastie GD, Nedwell J, Barham R, Brookes KL, Cordes LS, Bailey H, McLean N (2013) Framework for assessing impacts of pile-driving noise from offshore wind farm construction on a harbour seal population. Environ Impact Assess Rev 43:73–85CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Tougaard J, Kyhn LA, Amundin M, Wennerberg D, Bordin C (2012) Behavioral reactions of harbor porpoise to pile-driving noise. In: Popper AN, Hawkins AD (eds) Effects of noise on aquatic life. Advances in experimental medicine and biology, 730th edn. Springer Science + Business Media, New York, pp 277–280CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Harwood
    • 1
  • Stephanie King
    • 2
  • Cormac Booth
    • 2
  • Carl Donovan
    • 1
  • Robert S. Schick
    • 1
  • Len Thomas
    • 1
  • Leslie New
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Research into Ecological and Environmental Modelling (CREEM), The ObservatoryUniversity of St. AndrewsSt. Andrews FifeUK
  2. 2.Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU) MarineSt. Andrews FifeUK
  3. 3.Marine Mammal CommissionBethesdaUSA

Personalised recommendations