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Cross-Sectional Imaging of the Spleen

  • Stuart Bentley-Hibbert
  • Ahmed Abdelbaki
  • Khaled M. Elsayes
Chapter

Abstract

Various pathologies can involve the spleen. In this chapter, we start by illustrating the gross anatomy and microscopic features of the spleen. Then, we briefly discuss various cross-sectional techniques that are often utilized for imaging the spleen including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Finally, we review various splenic pathologies with a special emphasis placed on the imaging features and differential diagnoses of these entities through practical algorithmic approach.

Keywords

Spleen Computed tomography Magnetic resonance imaging 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart Bentley-Hibbert
    • 1
  • Ahmed Abdelbaki
    • 2
  • Khaled M. Elsayes
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyColumbia University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryGuthrie Robert Packer HospitalSayreUSA
  3. 3.Department of Diagnostic RadiologyThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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