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Pain Disparity: Assessment and Traditional Medicine

  • September WilliamsEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Millions of people in the world have acute and chronic pain because of (1) ignorance of clinicians, (2) lack of a standardized scientific approach, (3) failure to facilitate adequate treatment of pain by legitimate use of opiates, (4) inadequate balance between use of controlled substances for medical purposes and the prevention of their abuse, and (5) lack of appropriate use of the new non-opiate pharmaceuticals and integrative medicine armamentaria which has expanded over the past decade. Of ten developed countries, the World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that 37 % of adults in these populations have constant pain conditions. Pain is a public health concern because of its prevalence and increasing incidence. In 2010, in the United States, adults with constant pain were conservatively estimated at 16 million.

Keywords

Health Literacy Pain Management Traditional Medicine Pain Assessment Pain Clinician 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Academy of Pain Medicine 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Clinical Medical Ethics, Palliative Care and Film, Ninth Month ConsultsMill ValleyUSA

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