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Europe: Beyond the Canon

  • Víctor M. Fernández
Chapter
Part of the Ethical Archaeologies: The Politics of Social Justice book series (ETHARCHAEOL, volume 1)

Abstract

The inception of widely shared codes of practice for archaeologists throughout Europe in the last decades has undoubtedly contributed to enhance our daily practice, both scientifically and ethically. The next challenge ahead, if we are to both face the old and new multicultural circumstances and productively renovate our research goals and agendas, is to destabilize and dismantle in a deliberate way the “universal” components of our theoretical conceptions. We must approach and consent the up to now demonized “other” archaeologies in our society, represented by local people, “pseudoarchaeologists,” looters and private collectors, immigrants, and so forth. In conversing and learning from them we not only would fairly acknowledge our societal variety but also will enrich our visions of the past and eventually be better prepared for the ongoing combat with the true menace to a socially productive archaeology, which comes from a destructive, ultraliberal capitalist activity.

Keywords

Archaeological Record Catholic Church European Code Private Collector Crop Circle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Departamento de PrehistoriaUniversidad Complutense de MadridMadridSpain

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