Conceptualizing Youth BPD Within an MMPI-A Framework

Chapter

Abstract

The current chapter aims to provide an overview of the conceptualization and assessment of youth borderline personality disorder (BPD) using the MMPI-A. More broadly, BPD is considered from the perspective of dimensional temperament traits that can be identified in infancy and have direct conceptual and empirical links to youth BPD (e.g., Nigg et al., 2005). More specifically, we consider negative affectivity and inhibitory control as predominant traits underlying the disorder. Due to the intense trauma and stress-induced pseudo-psychotic symptoms experienced by many individuals with BPD, we also focus on the domain of psychoticism. This general conceptual framework is considered from an MMPI-A assessment perspective and the conceptual and empirical basis for this approach will be described. Clinical applications of this model are also discussed.

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Suggested Reading

  1. Archer, R. P. (2005). MMPI-A: Assessing adolescent psychopathology (3rd ed.). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  2. Archer, R. P., Ball, J. D., & Hunter, J. A. (1985). MMPI characteristics of borderline psychopathology in adolescent inpatients. Journal of Personality Assessment, 49, 47–55. doi: 10.1207/s15327752jpa 4901_10.Google Scholar
  3. Nigg, J. T., Silk, K. R., Stavro, G., & Miller, T. (2005). Disinhibition and borderline personality disorder. Development and Psychopathology, 17, 1129–1149. doi: 10.1017/S0954579405050534.Google Scholar
  4. McNulty, J. L., Harkness, A. R., Ben-Porath, Y. S., & Williams, C. L. (1997). Assessing the personality psychopathology five (PSY-5) in adolescents: New MMPI–A scales. Psychological Assessment, 9, 250–259. doi: 10.1037/1040-3590.9.3.250.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research School of Psychology, College of Medicine, Biology and EnvironmentThe Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyThe University of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA

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