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Teaching Cognitive Skills to Children with Autism

  • Jonathan TarboxEmail author
  • Adel C. Najdowski
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by deficits in language, socialization, and the presence of restricted interests (American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-V. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Cognition is an area of functioning that is critical to everyday functioning across all three of these areas. A large amount of research has documented cognitive deficits in individuals with ASD, in terms of general intellectual disability and specific areas of cognition, in individuals with or without intellectual disability. The topic of intellectual disability in ASD has received ample attention elsewhere and will not be the focus of this chapter. Instead, we will address particular areas of cognitive functioning as behavioral repertoires that are amenable to intervention. We begin by discussing basic philosophical differences between cognitive and behavioral approaches to the topic of cognition, not merely for scholarly interest but because doing so will lay the groundwork for how cognition can be researched and intervened upon behaviorally. Next, we review the burgeoning area of research into behavioral intervention for cognition in ASD. Finally, we dedicate a significant portion of the chapter to discussing future directions for research on teaching cognitive skills to children with ASD.

Keywords

Perspective taking Executive functions 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Autism and Related DisordersTarzanaUSA

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