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Fructose, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Sucrose, and Health: Modern Scientific Understandings

  • James M. RippeEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Nutrition and Health book series (NH)

Key Points

  • The metabolic and health effects of fructose, high fructose corn syrup, sucrose and health are controversial and subject of intense scientific debate.

  • Epidemiologic studies related to these three sugars do not establish cause and effect.

  • More randomized controlled trials are needed.

  • The purpose of this book is to provide a summary of modern scientific understandings related to these three sugars as well as non-nutritive sweeteners.

Keywords

Fructose High fructose corn syrup Sucrose 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Central Florida Medical SchoolOrlandoUSA
  2. 2.Rippe Lifestyle InstituteShrewsburyUSA
  3. 3.Rippe Lifestyle InstituteCelebrationUSA

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