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Key Biostratigraphic Events in the Siwalik Sequence

  • John C. Barry
  • Lawrence J. Flynn
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 180)

Abstract

Miocene movements of crustal plates brought about fundamental changes in the oceans by fragmenting the Tethys Seaway and further isolating the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific basins. Although controversial in the details of interpretation, the resulting paleoceanographic and tectonic events have been linked to global climate (Kennett et al., 1985; Woodruff, 1985; Hodell et al., 1986) and, largely through their effects on climate, can be seen to have had a far-reaching influence on the plants and animals of the Miocene.

Keywords

Late Miocene Geological Society Middle Miocene Biostratigraphic Unit Faunal Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • John C. Barry
    • 1
  • Lawrence J. Flynn
    • 1
  1. 1.Peabody MuseumHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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