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Modification of Heterosocial Skills Deficits

  • John P. Galassi
  • Merna Dee Galassi

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with heterosocial skills, which are those skills necessary for social interchange between members of the opposite sex. Although these skills are relevant across the life span, the bulk of existing research has been concerned with the skills that are important in the early stages of dating relationships between college students. Unfortunately, these skills represent somewhat a will-o’-the-wisp. When globally defined, effective skills can often be distinguished from ineffective ones. However, relatively little success has been enjoyed in identifying the specific behaviors that comprise them.

Keywords

Social Skill Social Anxiety Physical Attractiveness Counseling Psychology Social Skill Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • John P. Galassi
    • 1
  • Merna Dee Galassi
    • 2
  1. 1.Counseling Psychology, School of EducationUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Office of Developmental CounselingMeredith CollegeRaleighUSA

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