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Norepinephrine Induced Growth and Expression of Virulence Associated Factors in Enterotoxigenic and Enterohemorrhagic Strains of Escherichia coli

  • M. Lyte
  • B. Arulanandam
  • K. Nguyen
  • C. Frank
  • A. Erickson
  • D. Francis
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 412)

Summary

The small intestine is richly innervated by the sympathetic nervous system. High concentrations of monoamines, most notably norepinephrine, are found throughout the various intestinal layers. In order to determine whether norepinephrine is capable of influencing bacterial pathogenesis, the growth and production of virulence factors in ETEC and EHEC were examined in a physiologically relevant medium utilizing very low initial bacterial inoculums to more closely mimic in vivo conditions. The growth of ETEC strain B44 and the production of the K99 pilus adhesin on a protein equivalent basis was greatly increased in the presence of norepinephrine. Growth of EHEC 0157:H7 was also increased in norepinephrine containing medium as well as production of SLT-I and SLT-II. The ability of norepinephrine to increase both bacterial growth and expression of virulence factors was shown to be non-nutritional in nature. Given the abundant adrenergic innervation in the small intestine, these in vitro results suggest that the neurohumoral environment of the host may play a role in bacterial growth and expression of virulence factors.

Keywords

Mandelic Acid Monobasic Potassium Phosphate ETEC Strain Virulence Associate Factor Meridian Diagnostics 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Lyte
    • 1
  • B. Arulanandam
    • 1
  • K. Nguyen
    • 1
  • C. Frank
    • 1
  • A. Erickson
    • 2
  • D. Francis
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesMankato State UniversityMankatoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Veterinary ScienceSouth Dakota State UniversityBrookingsUSA

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