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Tropical Plants as Sources of Antiprotozoal Agents

  • J. David Phillipson
  • Colin W. Wright
  • Geoffrey C. Kirby
  • David C. Warhurst
Chapter
Part of the Recent Advances in Phytochemistry book series (RAPT, volume 27)

Abstract

Protozoa are the cause of a number of major diseases which spread massive misery and death, mainly throughout the tropical world. Malaria is the protozoal disease most feared by travellers to the tropics, but other protozoal diseases such as leishmaniasis, trypanosomiasis, amoebiasis and giardiasis cause havoc for many millions of people. Protozoal infections are not unique to the tropics and the AIDS epidemic has shown that other protozoa are capable of contributing to disease and death in cooler climates, as exemplified by infections of Cryptosporidium parvum which causes a diarrhoeal disease and Pneumocystis carinii which causes pneumonia. Tourists and business travellers may import tropical diseases; malaria, for example, is on the increase in non-tropical countries.1 It is reported that there were 1987 cases of imported malaria in the UK during 19892 and that about 1000 cases of imported malaria are diagnosed each year in the USA.3 It is not even necessary for a UK resident to travel abroad in order to contract malaria, because over the past decade mosquitoes have arrived on airplanes and have transmitted malaria to humans near international airports.1,2

Keywords

Antimalarial Activity Tropical Plant Antiplasmodial Activity Amoebic Dysentery Antiprotozoal Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. David Phillipson
    • 1
  • Colin W. Wright
    • 1
  • Geoffrey C. Kirby
    • 2
  • David C. Warhurst
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacognosy, The School of Pharmacy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical MedicineUniversity of LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of Medical Parasitology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical MedicineUniversity of LondonLondonUK

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