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Feline Infectious Peritonitis

  • Raoul J. de Groot
  • Marian C. Horzinek
Chapter
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is one of the most intriguing diseases caused by a Coronavirus. It involves immune-mediated phenomena such as antibody-dependent enhancement of virus infection- and immune complex-induced pathology. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence for the existence of a carrier state. FIP and feline corona viruses have been extensively reviewed (Pedersen, 1976b, 1983a,b, 1987a; Barlough and Stoddart, 1986, 1990; Olsen, 1993). Most of these reviews emphasized the pathology, epidemiology, and classical virology. During the last 10 years, our knowledge of the molecular biology of feline coronaviruses has increased considerably. We will summarize clinicopathologi-cal findings and the history of FIP research only briefly. The focus will be on the molecular aspects of feline coronaviruses and of FIP pathogenesis.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Infectious Bronchitis Virus Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Recombinant Vaccinia Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raoul J. de Groot
    • 1
  • Marian C. Horzinek
    • 1
  1. 1.Virology Division, Department of Infectious Diseases and ImmunologyUniversity of UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands

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