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Human Health Effects of Polychlorinated Biphenyls

  • William J. Nicholson
  • Philip J. Landrigan

Abstract

Industrial use of PCBs began in 1929 and since then PCBs have found wide use as dielectric fluids in electrical transformers and capacitors, as heat exchange or hydraulic fluids, and in a variety of other commercial applications. PCBs are a group of 209 structurally different chlorobiphenyl congeners consisting of two linked phenyl rings on which can be located from 1 to 10 chlorine atoms. Commercially produced PCBs consist of mixtures of from 50 to 90 individual congeners. The principal product used in the United States was manufactured by the Monsanto Company and sold under the trade name “Aroclor.” Table 1 lists the approximate percentages of PCBs in the most commonly used Aroclor mixtures. While many isomers exist for a specific number of chlorine atoms per molecule, nearly half the PCB congeners do not occur in the commercial mixtures.

Keywords

Biliary Tract Cancer Human Health Effect Benzene Hexachloride Neoplastic Nodule Altered Focus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • William J. Nicholson
    • 1
  • Philip J. Landrigan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Community MedicineMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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