Textile Finishes and Fluorosurfactants

  • Nandakumar S. Rao
  • Bruce E. Baker
Part of the Topics in Applied Chemistry book series (TAPP)

Abstract

Fluorochemicals carrying perfluoroalkyl groups (RF) are widely used to modify the surfaces of textiles and carpets, and hence impart resistance to water, oils, soils, and staining. In fact, fluorinated materials have essentially replaced silicones and hydrocarbon-based finishes as textile repellents, and function by imparting a condition of limited wettability to the treated substrate. The efficiency of the surface modification depends on the intrinsic repellency of the active fluorochemical, the extent of coverage of the textile by the fluorochemical, the orientation of the perfluoroalkyl segments, and the amount and location of the fluorochemical on the textile. Typically, 0.05 to 0.50 percent of the fluorochemical by weight of the textile is used to deliver durable repellency. The repellents are applied to textiles and carpets in mills as aqueous dispersions, and in some after-market applications, as solutions in halogenated solvents.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nandakumar S. Rao
    • 1
  • Bruce E. Baker
    • 1
  1. 1.DuPont Specialty ChemicalsJackson LaboratoryDeepwaterUSA

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