Rhinoviruses

  • Jack M. GwaltneyJr.

Abstract

Rhinoviruses are the most important common-cold viruses to be discovered. The name rhinovirus reflects the prominent nasal involvement seen in infections with these viruses. The large rhinovirus genus, which is a member of the Picornavirus family, contains over 100 different immunotypes. The discovery of the rhinoviruses led to the realization that the common cold is an enormously complex syndrome. The number of antigenically distinct rhinoviruses is so large that one can be infected with a different rhinovirus each year and still not experience all the known types in a lifetime. The antigenic diversity of the rhinovirus group has proved an insurmountable obstacle to rhinovirus vaccine development. It is now known that the cellular receptor site for rhinovirus is shielded from the immune system, eliminating it as a target for vaccines and further discouraging prospects for control of rhinovirus colds by this approach. Recent work on rhinovirus has focused on understanding pathogenesis and on developing control measures such as chemoprophylaxis, chemotherapy, and interruption of transmission.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack M. GwaltneyJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of Virginia School of MedicineCharlottesvilleUSA

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