Tumor-Infiltrating Dendritic Cells are Defective in Their Antigen-Presenting Function and Inducible B7 Expression

A Role in the Immune Tolerance to Antigenic Tumors
  • Pascal Chaux
  • Nathalie Favre
  • Bernard Bonnotte
  • Monique Moutet
  • Monique Martin
  • François Martin
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 417)

Abstract

Many human and experimental cancers express abnormal proteins, including the products of mutated oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, or viral genes, fusion proteins resulting from translocations, or products of normal but silent genes (1). At least some of these abnormal proteins should be recognized as antigens by T lymphocytes and induce an immune response leading to tumor rejection. However, these antigens are tolerated by the immune system, and tumors, instead of being rejected, progress and ultimately kill their host. Among other mechanisms, a defect in the presentation of tumor antigens to the immune system could explain this tolerance.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pascal Chaux
    • 1
  • Nathalie Favre
    • 1
  • Bernard Bonnotte
    • 1
  • Monique Moutet
    • 1
  • Monique Martin
    • 1
  • François Martin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology and Therapy of Cancer Faculty of MedicineCJF INSERM 94-8DijonFrance

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