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Cognitive Therapy with the Elderly

  • Meyer D. Glantz

Abstract

Historically, the elderly have constituted only a disproportionately small percentage of the psychotherapy patient population. Psychotherapists and health care providers, the elderly themselves, and their families have typically believed that psychotherapy for older adults is inappropriate, undesirable, and likely to be ineffective. The assumptions have typically been that the elderly’s psychiatric problems are a consequence of their deteriorating physical condition, the natural concomitants of their many losses, or even the appropriate manifestations of their age-determined developmental or life stage. The stereotypes that health care providers have about the elderly have kept them from recommending and referring the elderly for mental health evaluation and psychotherapy; the stereotypes that the elderly have had about psychotherapy have contributed to their reluctance to consider psychotherapeutic interventions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Meyer D. Glantz
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Private PracticeRockvilleUSA
  2. 2.Division of Clinical ResearchNational Institute of Drug AbuseRockvilleUSA

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