Social Allergens and the Reactions That They Produce

Escalation of Annoyance and Disgust in Love and Work
  • Michael R. Cunningham
  • Anita P. Barbee
  • Perri B. Druen

Abstract

Much of the research in our laboratory has focused on the positive aspects of human interaction, such as attraction (Cunningham, Roberts, Barbee, & Druen, 1995), partner selection strategies (Druen, 1995), helpfulness (Cunningham, Shaffer, Barbee, Wolfe, & Kelley, 1990), honesty (Cunningham, Wong, & Barbee, 1994), and socially supportive cheering-up behaviors (Barbee & Cunningham, 1995). Yet, there may be limits to what can be learned about relationship dynamics by focusing solely on the determinants of prosocial actions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael R. Cunningham
    • 1
  • Anita P. Barbee
    • 1
  • Perri B. Druen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA

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