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Introduced Predators and Avifaunal Extinction in New Zealand

  • Richard N. Holdaway
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Vertebrate Paleobiology book series (AIVP, volume 2)

Abstract

At 270,000 km2, New Zealand is one-thirtieth the area of Australia, one-third that of Madagascar, twice that of Cuba, and comparable in area to the British Isles, to the Philippines, and within the United States to the State of Colorado. Isolated in the southwestern Pacific, 1900 km east of Australia, New Zealand was the last major habitable landmass to be peopled, in this instance by Polynesians. Unlike the British Isles and the Philippines, which are partly on and partly off the continental shelf, New Zealand is so remote that despite zoogeographic and geotectonic evidence of a considerable antiquity, it lacked nonvolant land mammals when humans and their commensals colonized 700 years ago.

Keywords

Extinction Rate Main Island Mammalian Predator European Contact Storm Petrel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard N. Holdaway
    • 1
  1. 1.Palaecol ResearchChristchurchNew Zealand

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