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Self-Esteem pp 87-116 | Cite as

Causes and Consequences of Low Self-Esteem in Children and Adolescents

  • Susan Harter
Part of the The Plenum Series in Social / Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

The preceding comments from studies of young people by myself and colleagues are personally very distressing. Theoretically, they are perplexing. It is commonly asserted in the literature that the self-concept is a theory, a cognitive construction, and that its architecture—by evolutionary design—is extremely functional (see Allport, 1961; Bartlett, 1932; Brim, 1976; Damon & Hart, 1988; Epstein, 1973, 1981, 1991; Greenwald, 1980; Harter, 1983; Kelly, 1955; Lecky, 1945; Lynch, 1981; Markus, 1980; Piaget, 1965; Rogers, 1951; Sarbin, 1962). One such widely touted function is to maintain high self-esteem. Considerable evidence now exists that most people do exhibit a modest self-enhancing bias (Taylor & Brown, 1988).

Keywords

Suicidal Ideation Social Comparison Physical Appearance Physical Attractiveness Depressed Affect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Harter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyDenverUSA

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