Biochemistry of the Developing Autonomic Neuron

  • E. Giacobini
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 13)

Abstract

According to the theory proposed by Sperry (1), (2) patterning of synaptic connections is handled by growth mechanism directly, independently of function and with very high “selectivity”.According to the “selectivity theory” the establishment and maintenance of synaptic connections depends on highly specific cytochemical affinities (“similarities”?). This mechanism can be regulated in at least three different ways: a) differentiation (genetically directed) b) induction by means of contact c) other effects, like “embryonal gradient”.

Keywords

Chick Embryo Synaptic Connection Sympathetic Neuron Sympathetic Ganglion Spinal Ganglion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Giacobini
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of PharmacologyKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden

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