Vivid Fantasy and Hallucinatory Abilities in the Life Histories of Excellent Hypnotic Subjects (“Somnambules”): Preliminary Report with Female Subjects

  • Sheryl C. Wilson
  • Theodore X. Barber

Abstract

Throughout the history of hypnosis, excellent hypnotic subjects (sometimes referred to as somnambules or somnambulists) have been studied in terms of how they respond and what they experience when given suggestions to hallucinate, to age regress, to experience anesthesia, to go into a trance, etc. Although their behavior in a hypnotic or suggestive setting has been looked at extensively, there has been very little research in which they were intensively interviewed to discover how their extremely high responsiveness to suggestions is related to their life histories.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sheryl C. Wilson
    • 1
  • Theodore X. Barber
    • 1
  1. 1.Cushing HospitalFraminghamUSA

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