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Developmental Therapy: A Program Model for Providing Individual Services in the Community

  • Robert J. Reichler
  • Eric Schopler

Abstract

In this paper we discuss some of the problems of bringing therapeutic services to children. It is by now clear that our understanding of both normal development and developmental abnormalities is seriously incomplete. We have neither a coherent body of knowledge nor a comprehensive theory, and most treatments available for an abnormally developing child do not adequately utilize what knowledge we do have. In the first part of this paper some basic reasons for the lack of adequate services will be explored, with special reference to the problems of autistic and other severely deviant children. The purpose of this exploration is to identify issues that have interfered with the development of adequate care, and to suggest some essential elements for the provision of appropriate services for children and their families. In this discussion, autism and psychosis are used interchangeably, both referring to rating systems (Reichler and Schopler, 1971) based on the Creak (1964) criteria.

Keywords

Program Model Autistic Child Handicapped Child Retarded Child Home Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Reichler
    • 1
  • Eric Schopler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, School of MedicineUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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