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The Effect of Ovarian Steroids on Glucose, Insulin, and Growth Hormone

  • W. N. Spellacy

Abstract

As the popularity of the oral method for fertility control increased, so did the recognition of potentially serious complications. One area which has been extensively Investigated is the effect of these medications on carbohydrate metabolism. Our investigations involve five areas of study:
  1. 1)

    prospective studies of blood glucose and insulin levels in women using several types of oral contraceptives;

     
  2. 2)

    cross-sectional studies of blood glucose and insulin levels in women who have used various types of oral contraceptives for prolonged periods of time;

     
  3. 3)

    investigations of the individual components (estrogens and progestins) of the oral contraceptive drugs;

     
  4. 4)

    studies of the characteristics of women developing the most marked alterations in order to determine a profile for the high risk group;

     
  5. 5)

    studies of human growth hormone (HGH) levels in women using oral contraceptives thus seeking to determine a mechanism involved in these alterations.

     

Keywords

Growth Hormone Menstrual Cycle Oral Contraceptive Human Growth Hormone Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. N. Spellacy
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA

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