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Sequences Involved in the Replication of Coronaviruses

  • P. J. Bredenbeek
  • J. Charite
  • J. F. A. Noten
  • W. Luytjes
  • M. C. Horzinek
  • B. A. M. van der Zeijst
  • W. J. M. Spaan
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 218)

Abstract

Coronaviruses are enveloped viruses with a positive stranded RNA genome of about 20 kilobases. Upon infection 6 subgenomic mRNAs are produced from a negative stranded template of genome length (Stern and Kennedy, 1980; Spaan et al., 1981; Lai et al., 1982). RNase T1 fingerprinting and hybridization studies have shown that these subgenomic RNAs form a 3′ coterminal nested set (Leibowitz et al., 1981; Lai et al., 1981; Spaan et al., 1982). Only the gene located at the 5′ end of each subgenomic RNA is translated.

Keywords

Intergenic Region Leader Sequence Infectious Bronchitis Virus Mouse Hepatitis Virus Subgenomic RNAs 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. J. Bredenbeek
    • 1
  • J. Charite
    • 1
  • J. F. A. Noten
    • 1
  • W. Luytjes
    • 1
  • M. C. Horzinek
    • 1
  • B. A. M. van der Zeijst
    • 2
  • W. J. M. Spaan
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of VirologyThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Section BacteriologyState Univervity UtrechtThe Netherlands

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