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Psychological and Behavioral Management

  • Stephen Sulzbacher

Abstract

Important issues face psychologists evaluating individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). They include school placement, management of food-related behaviors, and problems such as stubbornness and temper tantrums. PWS families need guidance as they look beyond current crises and address their feelings and plans about where their children will live and work when they reach adulthood. The need for psychological advice seems to occur at predictable intervals as PWS individual grow up. Establishing a general intelligence level is important in the preschool years, and appropriate educational placement requires psychological evaluation and recommendations. In most cases, once the transition into elementary school is completed, the need for psychological services diminishes until the child is about 10 years old, the time at which stubbornness and temper tantrums generally intensify and require intervention. The transition to junior high school, where students are often less directly supervised by a single teacher, is another point at which educators frequently seek psychological advice.

Keywords

Junior High School Group Home Behavioral Management Temper Tantrum Borderline Intellectual Functioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Prader-Willi Syndrome Association 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Sulzbacher

There are no affiliations available

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