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Methods of Quantitating Cerebral Near Infrared Spectroscopy Data

  • M. Cope
  • D. T. Delpy
  • E. O. R. Reynolds
  • S. Wray
  • J. Wyatt
  • P. van der Zee
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 215)

Abstract

Non invasive infrared spectroscopy is a well established technique for monitoring changes in the oxygenation status of tissues (1). The technique has in particular been successfully employed to monitor changes in cerebral blood and tissue oxygenation by observing the absorption of haemoglobin and cytochrome aa3 respectively. Because of the highly light scattering nature of the tissues studied, it has normally not been possible to quantitate the observed changes.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Cerebral Blood Volume Optical Path Length Near Infrared Spectroscopy Blood Volume Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Cope
    • 1
  • D. T. Delpy
    • 1
  • E. O. R. Reynolds
    • 2
  • S. Wray
    • 3
  • J. Wyatt
    • 2
  • P. van der Zee
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical Physics and Bio-EngineeringUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of PaediatricsUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of PhysiologyUniversity College LondonLondonUK

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