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InVivo and InVitro Models of Demyelinating Diseases — VIII: Genetic, Immunologic and Cellular Influences on JHM Virus Infection of Rats

  • O. Sorensen
  • S. Beushausen
  • S. Puchalski
  • S. Cheley
  • R. Anderson
  • M. Coulter-Mackie
  • S. Dales
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 173)

Abstract

A number of mouse hepatitis viruses, including MHV-A59, MHV-3, and JHM, have been used as in vivo models of neurotropic viral infections (Hirano et al., 1980; Knobler et al., 1981; Lampert et al., 1973; Le Prevost et al., 1975). The majority of experiments with these agents have involved mice as the host, a system which may be complicated by the viscerotropism of some of these coronaviruses. Previous work in our laboratory (Sorensen et al., 1980, 1982) and by others (Nagashima et al., 1978, 1979; Hirano et al., 1980) demonstrated that rats injected intracerebrally (IC) with JHM virus (JHMV) offer a challenging model for studies of neurotropic agents interacting with the central nervous system (CNS). The presence of anti-coronavirus antibodies in a high proportion of the human population (MacNaughton, 1982) give these models added relevance in regard to enquiries into the viral etiology of human diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), among them multiple sclerosis.

Keywords

Mixed Culture Demyelinating Disease Central Nervous System Tissue Mouse Hepatitis Virus cDNA Hybridization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Sorensen
    • 1
  • S. Beushausen
    • 1
  • S. Puchalski
    • 1
  • S. Cheley
    • 1
  • R. Anderson
    • 1
  • M. Coulter-Mackie
    • 1
  • S. Dales
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of Western OntarieLondonCanada

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