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A One Year Study of Coronavirus SD Infection in Mice

  • L. D. Jankovsky
  • J. S. Burks
  • P. Licari
  • B. L. Devald
  • M. C. Kemp
Chapter
  • 405 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 173)

Abstract

Coronavirus SD was isolated in mouse brain following intracerebral inoculation of autopsy brain material from a multiple sclerosis patient (1). This isolate is serologically related to the human coronavirus OC-43 and the murine coronavirus A59. It is antigenically distant from JHM, the prototype demyelinating strain of mouse hepatitis virus (2). As previously reported, intracerebral (IC) inoculation of SD into mice induces prominent demyelinating lesions in the spinal cord during the first 30 days post inoculation (PI) (3). This paper describes the pathogenesis of SD infection of mice through PI day 365.

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Patient Infectious Virus Post Inoculation Spinal Cord Lesion Aqueductal Stenosis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. D. Jankovsky
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. S. Burks
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Licari
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. L. Devald
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. C. Kemp
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Neurological DiseasesRocky Mountain Multiple Sclerosis CenterUSA
  2. 2.Veterans Administration Medical CenterUniversity of Colorado School of MedicineDenverUSA

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